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Upper Limb Tension Test

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Other Names

Upper Limb Tension Test: Radial Nerve Protocol. (A) Starting Position: shoulder is in 90 degrees of abduction, elbow in full flexion, the forearm is fully pronated, the wrist and fingers placed in full extension and ipsilateral lateral flexion of the cervical spine. (B) Initiation of motion is first conducted by placing the fingers and wrist in to full flexion while maintaining the elbow, forearm, shoulder, and cervical spine positions. (C) Elbow extension and forearm pronation is started while still maintaining the shoulder in 90 degrees of abduction. (D) The shoulder is depressed and the cervical spine is laterally flexed to the contra-lateral side. [1]
  • Elvey's upper limb tension test
  • Brachial plexus tension test
  • Elvey's test
  • ULTT

Purpose

  • To evaluate peripheral nerves as a cause of neck or upper extremity pain

Description

Radial Nerve Protocol

  • Starting Position: shoulder is in 90 degrees of abduction, elbow in full flexion, the forearm is fully pronated, the wrist and fingers placed in full extension and ipsilateral lateral flexion of the cervical spine.
  • Initiation of motion is first conducted by placing the fingers and wrist in to full flexion while maintaining the elbow, forearm, shoulder, and cervical spine positions.
  • Elbow extension and forearm pronation is started while still maintaining the shoulder in 90 degrees of abduction.
  • The shoulder is depressed and the cervical spine is laterally flexed to the contra-lateral side.

Pathology


Evidence

Cervical Radiculopathy

  • [2]
    • Sensitivity 72–83%
    • Specificity 11–33%

See Also


References

  1. Robb, Andrew, and Sandy Sajko. "Conservative management of posterior interosseous neuropathy in an elite baseball pitcher’s return to play: a case report and review of the literature." The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association 53.4 (2009): 300.
  2. Rubinstein SM, Pool JJ, van Tulder MW, et al. A systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of provocative tests of the neck for diagnosing cervical radiculopathy. Eur Spine J. 2007;16:307–19.
Created by:
John Kiel on 23 April 2020 13:19:14
Authors:
Last edited:
25 May 2023 07:28:34
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